Wither Nos Amours

March 30, 2018 § 1 Comment

Rusty Staub died yesterday.  ‘Le Grand Orange’ was the first franchise icon for the Montreal Expos.  The Expos, in hindsight, were a star-crossed franchise from the getgo.  Staub arrived in Montreal in the winter of 1969, just before the Expos inaugural season.  He was dealt away in 1972, to the New York Mets.  Social media today in the United States remembers Staub as a long-time Met.  In Canada, he is an Expo.

Staub was before my time, he was traded away before I was born.  But I grew up knowing the story of Le Grand Orange, the greatest player in franchise history when I was a kid.  He did return to the ‘Spos, as we called them, in 1979, though he left again in 1980 for Texas.  His #10 was the first number retired by the Expos.

His death got me to thinking about the sad history of my first baseball team.  The Expos lasted from 1969-2004, before moving to Washington.  They weren’t a great team, to be honest.  They had their ups, but had more downs, and they left town with an historic losing record.  They won the NL East once, during the 1981 strike season, but then they lost a playoff to the Los Angeles Dodgers.  Rick Monday hit the homer that crushed my childhood dreams of a World Series for the ‘Spos.  That day is still called Blue Monday in Montreal.

The Expos were a decent team in the early 1980s.  But they peaked in the mid-90s.  In 1992 and 1993, the Toronto Blue Jays won back-to-back World Series.  In 1994, the Montreal Expos were the best team in baseball, with a 74-40 record on 12 August 1994, when the players went on strike, and were well ahead of the Atlanta Braves in the NL East.  The Expos were the favourites for the 1994 World Series.  Alas, it was not to be.  The 1994 players’ strike was disastrous for Nos Amours, as the Expos were called in French.  And over the next 10 years, they died a slow and painful death due to a horrible stadium, worse ownership and MLB.

In thinking about Staub yesterday and today, I realized that the Expos do not even own their own franchise icons.  All of the icons of the Montreal Expos are famous for, or even more famous for, their play in other cities.  Like Staub, Gary ‘The Kid’ Carter went to the Mets, where he also won a World Series.  André ‘The Hawk’ Dawson (my childhood favourite player) went onto Chicago, which had a grass field, easier on the Hawk’s knees.  Tim Raines went on to play for a handful of teams, winning two World Series with the Yankees.  Pedro Martinez, perhaps the Expos’ greatest pitcher, is more famous for his exploits in ending the Boston Red Sox’ long World Series drought. Larry Walker, Canada’s first superstar, became a batting champion in Denver.  And the Expos’ last great player, Vladimir Guerrero, is more famous for playing for the California/Anaheim/Los Angeles Angels.

It’s a depressing tale.  Of these greats, all but Walker and Staub are in the Hall of Fame.  The only consolation is that Carter, Raines, and Dawson went in wearing their Expos caps.

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